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Snaile Wins 2016 International Postal Technology Award

Canadian company Snaile Inc. (www.snaile.com). has won the prestigious Digital Innovation of the Year award

Snaile Shortlisted for 2017 World Post & Parcel Awards Innovation Category Sponsored by Pitney Bowes

The World Post & Parcel Awards is the global platform to recognize and promote mail and express excellence. Mail and express operators from all over the world compete to win…

Parcel Locker Threat prevention

Patrick Armstrong, CEO of technology developer Snaile, speaks to Postal and Parcel Technology International about the potential threat posed by parcel lockers, and what can be done to nullify the problem.

Smart first-mile street letter mailboxes

Patrick Armstrong, CEO of Snaile, explains how the Internet of Things can be leveraged to provide greater efficiency when it comes to street letter-box collections

Universal Service Obligation & Time for Change 

The World Post & Parcel Awards is the global platform to recognize and promote mail and express excellence. Mail and express operators from all over the world compete to win…

Snail Mail Alert

A Canadian import looks to bring digital mail notification to Americans who pick up their mail from cluster boxes.

First Mile & Internet of Things

Snaile First Mile Applications for Postal Operators and Courier Companies

Last Mile & Internet of Things

Snaile Last Mile Applications for Postal Operators and Courier Companies

Snaile’s Internet of Things (IoT) postal industry concepts & solutions are discussed in the Postal Innovation Platform’s (PIP) publication

Snaile discusses on page 20 & 21 in PIP’s Postal Industry Newsletter, Innovation & Markets “Welcome to the Future – why posts are able to become leaders in innovation & new technologies” volume 4  |  issue 1  |  2016.

Discussing Snaile IoT Technology Applications for Postal & Courier Operators

Snaile CEO, Patrick Armstrong, discusses how its compartment check & notify Internet of Things (IoT) technology applies to postal operators, courier companies and consumers in both first and last mile applications. PostalVision2020/6.0 Conference, Washington DC, March 2016.

Using Internet of Things (ioT) technology to streamline postal and courier first mile services

Embedded (IoT) technology can deliver a range of benefits for postal and courier services, from alerting customers of deliveries in passive mailbox applications, to improving postal service efficiency

Can sensor technology increase P.O. Box utilization rates?

Most postal service operators offer a P.O. Box service. However, many are not used at their optimum level. Encouraging more use then should be a priority of operators.

How parcel locker content detection technology will help postal operators manage parcels

Many postal operators, such as Canada Post and Singapore Post, have elected to install mechanical parcel lockers as part of their delivery network in a bid to resolve “last mile” delivery problems or costs. This allows the postal operator to place the parcel in the locker following the first delivery attempt, giving the customer access via a key placed in the customer’s mailbox. These parcel lockers are installed so one parcel locker can serve many customers.

What do consumers think of a P.O Box/Community mailbox mail has arrived notification system?

A recent (March 2015) survey of customers by a third party company* on behalf of Snaile found that 42 percent of those questioned said ‘yes’ they wanted a notification device while 10 percent said they may be interested.
The research, conducted on 400 Canadian households who currently use or expect to use community mailboxes, suggested that though consumers have been quietly using P.O. Boxes and community boxes likely because many have no choice, more work needs to be done to improve the customer experience and educate the user in these new technologies.

Snaile mailbox sensor sends you a text

Have you got mail? For Canadians who still have residential delivery, it’s merely a matter of peeking into the